MCom 100w

Writing Workshop

DBH reopens

I’ll see you in DBH 224 for Wednesday’s class. Dwight Bentel Hall has been cleared for occupancy, so we’ll be back on our home turf this week.

Dwight Bentel HallHere are excerpts from an email about DBH’s reopening from Andy Feinstein, Provost and VP of Academic Affairs at SJSU:

I am pleased to report that Dwight Bentel Hall (DBH) will reopen on Tuesday Sept. 2. Classes scheduled for DBH will resume there on Tuesday….

Repair crews have completed virtually all repairs related to water damage that resulted from a steam valve leak. (A few remedial steps remain, but they should not materially affect building occupants.)

Independent air quality tests on Wednesday determined that being inside DBH poses “… no greater risk of exposure to fungal spores than the general public walking on campus in the outdoor air.”

I am grateful to FD&O staff and the work crews that worked diligently to address this situation, and to the affected faculty, staff and students for their patience.

Finding our way

It’s clear that you all have pretty good skills of deduction, since you found ENG 301 for today’s class, despite the error in my previous blog post. Like you, I was left wondering if the Engineering Building had a basement. Fortunately, I ran into a 100W student who’d already figured out it probably should be Room 301, not Room 30 … or I might still be wandering the halls.

Thank you for your patience as we work around the temporary closure of Dwight Bentel Hall. As I receive new information about the building and such, I will keep you posted via this blog and emails.

New classroom

They’ve found a classroom we can use until Dwight Bentel Hall is cleared for occupancy. It’s Room 30 (oops, that’s Room 301) in the Engineering Building.

I’ll see you there on Wednesday.

This just in

Welcome to the class blog for MCOM 100w, section 1. It looks like we’re going to have a rocky start.

The big news is that we will not be meeting in DBH 224 tomorrow due to recent water damage in the building. Instead, you will be directed to go to the new Student Union Ballrooms A and B to look for me at a table with our classroom number on it (e.g., DBH 224). We will probably reconvene outside somewhere nearby for the day, and then see where they decide put us for Wednesday’s class.

In the meantime, you can find information about this class — including the syllabus, class schedule and assignments — on this blog. You can download a pdf copy of the course syllabus from the syllabus page of this blog. Or click below:

>> Download_fall ’14 syllabus (pdf) <<

Please check this blog regularly, as the class schedule, assignments and due dates can change. If they do, those changes will be noted on the class schedule in orange so they’ll be easy to spot.

Throughout the semester, I expect you to write like an entry-level media professional — that is, I expect your writing to be accurate, clear and concise. If you have any unresolved writing issues, this is the semester to work them out. Don’t make me resort to “vandalism.”

 

Field trip pics

At the Japanese American Internment Memorial in downtown San Jose.
100w students
Students in section 1
.
100w students, s2
Students in section 2

Thanks for a good semester.

$3,000 scholarship

Enter the Freedom of Speech PSA Contest for a chance to earn a $3,000 scholarship.
PSA contest

Each entry should creatively address “What does freedom of speech mean to me?” or stress the importance of the First Amendment.

One winning entry in each category — radio and television — will receive a prize of $3,000 in scholarship money.

Winning PSAs will be distributed to broadcast stations nationwide, as well as carried on the NAB Spot Center and on the “First Amendment Center’s One For All” website.

To enter the contest, create a 30-second public service announcement on the freedom of speech for radio or television broadcast to win scholarship money. Entries are due by May 9, 2014. More details are available on the contest website.

The PSA competition is presented by the National Association of Broadcasters Education Foundation (NABEF) and the Broadcast Education Foundation (BEA).

Ethical extra credit

Yes, doing the right thing can earn you extra credit. Just attend the sixth annual Spuler Ethics Symposium on diversity in the media, write a 350- to 500-word news story, news release or reflective essay about it, and post it on your blog … and earn up to 15 points extra credit.

Spuler Ethics SymposiumThe focus of this year’s symposium couldn’t be more timely: Diversity in the media, including how issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, religious cultures and disabilities are portrayed and conveyed in advertising, journalism and public relations.

The guest panel includes: SJSU graduate Janelle Wang, TV news anchor, NBC Bay Area Channel 11; JMC Lecturer Lloyd La Cuesta, former South Bay bureau chief, KTVU Channel 2; Dona Nichols, JMC “Diversity in Media” lecturer; and Dr. Vernon Andrews, SJSU kinesiology lecturer. The panel is moderated by JMC Prof. Matt Cabot.

The Spuler Ethics Symposium, which is sponsored by the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, will be held 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30, in Engineering Hall 189.

The Spuler Symposium is named for Phil and Dean Spuler, who met at San Jose State in the late 1940s as staff members of the Spartan Daily newspaper. Both the Spulers had successful careers as journalists. The Spuler estate created an endowed fund for media ethics in 2008 to help students who are passionate about journalism achieve their goals.

Convo typos

Imagine my dismay to see so many AP style and other errors in the JMC spring 2014 convocation packet. Oh dear. Apparently they didn’t pay attention to these kinds of things in JOUR 61, MCOM 100W, or PR 190.

But you can benefit from their carelessness by identifying and correcting their errors. I’ll add 2 extra credit points to your grade if you add a comment to this blog post that identifies and corrects one of their errors.

One correction per person, please, so several of you can share the “wealth.”

JMC convocation Good job! Thanks to all who suggested corrections.

 

CCMA highlights

14095_110434648992550_4289460_nYou may already have heard that some of your classmates who toil away at the Spartan Daily were recently honored for their work at the California College Media Association’s annual awards banquet in San Diego.

Spartan Daily staffers received nine CCMA awards, including:

  • Stephanie Wong and Christiana Cobb shared the first place award for Best Special Section for putting together the Daily‘s food issue
  • Raphael Kluzniok took two awards — first place for Best Sports Photo and third place for Best News Photo
  • Codi Mills won two awards — a second place for Best Photo Series and third place for Best Sports Photo
  • Carolyn Seng took second place for Best Features Photo
  • Leeta-Rose Ballester was honored for her story on a family of farm workers

Keynote CCMA speaker was Margaret Sullivan of the New York Times. She recently posted a column, “Lodestars in a murky media world,” based on her CCMA presentation and some of the discussions she had with those in attendance. In it, she talks about the changing media landscape and what it means for recent grads and current journalism majors. She also highlights the journalistic values she thinks will remain important for the next generation of journalists. Check it out.

Some questions have no answers

If you want to read a hella good long-form story, check out “The Reckoning” in The New Yorker.

This story focuses on Peter Lanza, the father of the Sandy Hook Elementary School killer, as he tries to make sense of how his son came to commit mass murder … without anyone seeing that coming. I found this story to be both chilling and gripping.

The author, Andrew Solomon, is a writer and lecturer on psychology, politics, and the arts, and an activist in LGBT rights, mental health, and the arts. He won a National Book Award for “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression.”

Post Navigation